Thursday, May 30, 2013

Just keep breathing...

OY! The good news is that my asthma is back in the normal range - I can breathe deeply - Ahhhhh! Turns out this is exceptionally important because I had to see my bone/joint doc today.... and I got another freakin' shot. ERMERGERD!!! Human pincushion here!

My shoulder is still meh - but the elbow is crazy bad. The layman's term is Tennis Elbow. The Doctor's term is Lateral Epicondylitis. My term is F#$% This Sh#$!  Lol.  Here's a peek at what's goin' on in there...
Looks fun, yeah?
So they poked a needle in there, dug it around (and around, and around) while I did my childbirth breathing (lol), stuck a bandaid on it and away I went. I hit up my pharmacy to fill the Voltaren prescription (topical NSAID), and realized I was still wearing the bandaid. Oops. I forgot to pull it off right away - I'm allergic to the adhesive in bandaids. Drat. Now I have a white band where it was, surrounded by a red inflamed outline. Awesome.

I dashed off to pick up my daughter from college (wow that's so weird to say), then stopped to fill the tank for my other daughter who's driving up to Sacramento in my car, and when I reached for the gas my elbow screamed, "NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"  It was not a good moment. OMG, my elbow is absolutely, ridiculously, horribly in pain. There are no words. It's just pounding. Erg. And of course - this is my right arm. I'm right-handed. Joy.

The first 48 hours after a cortisone shot are brutal. Particularly in small joints like the elbow. The pain grows and grows as the fluid spreads. After that, barring any complications, the pain will subside, and the cortisone will reduce the inflammation allowing the tendon tears to heal. I go back in 4 weeks. If this shot doesn't do the trick, then next step is physical therapy, then surgery where they remove the torn tissue and scar tissue (plus any bone spurs and whatnot), then basically poke holes in the bone to force the body to release anti-inflammatory magic and jumpstart the natural healing process which is currently stalled.

Hopefully that can all be avoided. As of today, I am upping my antioxidant and vitamin D intake in the hopes that I can reduce the inflammation and promote healing on my own.

Oh, and FYI - feeding oneself with the non-dominant hand is dangerous. Hot tomato soup, spoon, left hand =  a load of laundry and an ice pack. Just sayin'.

Oh - and another FYI - don't google tennis elbow surgery while in the images tab. There are things you can never un-see.

So... I'm breathing deep (and grateful that I can) and just movin' on forward. I cannot work the arm for 7 days, so now that my asthma has died down, I'll focus on core and legs in the gym. Once I've got the green light to use my arm again, we'll see what we see.

I guess I'll just keep swimmin'  :-D


And in a completely random event, but so typical of my life, I was typing this post, when I saw something out of the corner of my eye... I looked up to see a BABY BUNNY dash into my closet and behind my daughter's wedding dress. WTF???? I am not kidding! Bethany helped me catch the lil' guy in a shoe box, and I ran for the camera... I took a pic and the bugger leapt out of the box and back behind the clothes and shoes! We jumped and screamed like crazy! Hahahahaha!!!!  We finally recaptured him, then released him out front where he scampered away.

Never a dull moment, folks!!



4 comments:

  1. I can relate. I've had lateral epicondylitis on both sides. The left was injected three times over the course of a year....that was his limit. The symptoms always returned about 3-4 months later. Then I had the surgery and have not had any trouble since then. The right was injected twice and the second time was the charm. No problems for the past couple years. Good luck with the injections.....I know how uncomfortable they are!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Active Release Therapy cured my tennis elbow. (Trigger point therapy on steroids) I couldn't turn a doorknob and it was like a magic bullet. Well, a magic bullet that took 6-8 weeks of treatment to work, but I consider it money and time well spent. Anytime it starts to rear its ugly little head I go back in for a tweak and it's gone.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh.... will this therapy work exactly as yours?... Because m looking to get Tennis Elbow Treatment In Phoenix next month and I am little afraid too....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I ended up having to have surgery on my elbow, but it's been fine ever since. :-)

      Delete